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The Ghosts of History
Moises Saman

Moises Saman is a documentary photographer and a member of Magnum Photos. His work has received numerous awards, including the 2015 Guggenheim Grant for Photography, the W. Eugene Smith Memorial Fund 2014, the Henri Nannen Preis 2014, the World Press Photo 2004, 2007, 2014, and Pictures of the Year International 2012, 2014, 2015. Saman is a regular contributor to National Geographic, The New Yorker TIME, The New York Times Magazine, among other international publications. From 2007-2012 he was a regular contributor to The New York Times, and from 2000-2007 was a staff photographer at Newsday newspaper in New York. His first monograph Discordia was published in 2016.
In The Ghosts of History Moises Saman commemorates the twentieth anniversary of the US-led invasion of Iraq by exploring the construction, through images and language, of competing narratives of war. This exhibition is based on Saman’s latest book Glad Tidings of Benevolence, a book that represents the culmination of Saman’s extensive work across Iraq.
‘My photographs are not intended to represent an objective account of the Iraq war against which to compare the texts. Rather, the book grapples with my own role and power as a narrator - particularly one with access to foreign publications - and the biases and limitations inevitably embedded in my work Saman began working as a newspaper photographer in Iraq shortly before the invasion in 2003. He has covered the US occupation and withdrawal, displacement, human rights abuses, humanitarian crises, governance and ISIS. Rather than present a linear historical account of Iraq after Saddam Hussein, Saman aims to convey the cacophony of voices that have narrated the war.
In this exhibition, photographs by Saman are presented alongside texts including quotes from political and military figures, lists of killed Iraqi civilians and US coalition military personnel, an edited log of military operations, handbooks for soldiers, redacted official transcripts and pop culture references that reflect a sinisterly ironic lexicon of war. The pairings of text and photograph provoke questions about narrative formation in war. Some pairings reveal a clash between Saman’s visual representation of the conflict and official discourse, while others provide unexpected intersections or bridges.

Date
29 April-29 May
Opening event 6:00 pm

Moria and Pikpa: Antechambers of Escape
Knut Bry

Knut Bry is an internationally acclaimed Norwegian photographer and filmmaker, born on October 3, 1946, in Hallingdal, Norway. His career spans over six decades, and since the 1970s, he has worked worldwide, primarily as a fashion and advertising photographer. Bry’s work has received international recognition across genres, and he has won a number of photographic awards, among them Photographer of the Year in the United States in 1986 and in Norway in 1989.– from editorial fashion series to artist portraits of Whitney Houston, to worldwide reports for VOGUE and The Condé Nast Traveler magazine. Knut is a passionate humanitarian and has spent the last few years working in refugee camps on the island of Lesvos in Greece.
Preus Museum – Norway’s National Museum of Photography, presents the exhibition “Moria and Pikpa: Antechambers of Escape”, featuring the work of Knut Bry. The exhibition showcases his photographs from the refugee camps Pikpa and Moria on the Greek island of Lesvos, Greece. In 2015, the refugee camp Moria, quickly became the symbol of the crisis in modern European refugee policy. Bry has worked as a volunteer in the refugee camp Pikpa, and he often visited the Moria camp to document the conditions and donate clothes.
These are two camps built on vastly different value systems: Pikpa was an independent, open camp based on collaboration, while Moria is a very large camp described by aid workers as a prison. Between 2016 and 2020, he visited Greece seven times until he was arrested, stripped of all equipment, and accused of espionage. Bry’s images are exhibited alongside texts written by Katrin Glatz Brubakk, the author of “Moria - Inside Europe’s Largest Refugee Camp”.
Bry is an activist as well as a famous photographer, and the exhibition to be shown in Amman is a testament to his strong commitment to the suffering of refugees

Date
1-29 May
Opening event 6:30 pm
Address

What are Gen Z’s hopes, dreams, realities, and challenges in Jordan?
Laura Boushnak

Laura Boushnak is a Palestinian photographer based in Amman, Jordan. Her work mainly focuses on the Arab world, looking at issues that stem from her own personal experience of gender, education, and aftermath of war. Laura began her career in 1999, as a photographer for the Associated Press in Lebanon. She then went on to work with the Agence France-Presse (AFP) at its Middle East hub in Cyprus and its headquarters in Paris. During this nine-year span, Boushnak’s experience included covering hard news in conflict zones such as the war in Iraq and the 2006 Israel-Hezbollah war. Since 2008, Laura Boushnak has been working as an independent photographer, commissioned for editorial assignments by The New York Times and other publications, while also working on long-term personal projects in the Middle East
In a time when youth unemployment in Jordan is high – especially for young women, refugees, and other marginalized youth – what do youth look for, dream of, and fight for in their pursuit of a better future? The photo exhibition, created by photographer Laura Boushnak, brings together youth stories from different stages of their lives, geographies, and other realms of opportunities in their pursuit of a future with meaningful jobs and economic empowerment. For both Jordanians and Syrian refugees in education and formal and informal employment, the exhibition will showcase the youth generation in Jordan, which is among the best educated yet the least economically empowered in the region. The exhibition is part of the Najahna program by Plan International Jordan and Denmark, the Norwegian Refugee Council, Confederation of Danish Industries, Jordanian Chamber of Industries, Royal Health Awareness Society, and Includovate with support from the Novo Nordic Foundation. The Najahna program works to increase access to quality education, bolster pathways to meaningful employment, including self-employment, and provide equal opportunities for young people in Jordan between the ages of 15 and 25, specifically focusing on adolescent girls and young women.

Date
15-29 May
Opeing event 6:00 pm
Address

Cacti: A Visual Protest Against the Silencing of Palestinian Voices in Germany
Rasha Al Jundi

Rasha Al Jundi (1984) is a Palestinian documentary photographer and visual storyteller. She grew up in the UAE, after which she moved to Lebanon to pursue higher education. During her seven year stay in the country, she volunteered with the Lebanese Red Cross and worked with a local civil society organisation coordinating rural development programs. Between 2009 and 2021, she worked with several non-governmental organisations, in the Near East, and Africa. Her work generally follows a social documentary pathway. Her work has been exhibited in Beirut, London, New York and Tokyo. Rasha is the 2022 Ian Parry grant recipient and a graduate from the International Center for Photography (ICP), New York.
“Can you imagine what life must have been like with a four meter high wall and an almost 70 meter wide death strip right at your doorstep?” This quote is displayed to the public in Berlin. This is what Germany wants you to imagine. But for many Palestinians living in the city, they don’t have to imagine. They live this back home, in a very stark physical and political reality. Cacti is a photography series that combines black-and-white digital images with text and line art in selected frames. The project aims to portray the anger, frustration, and hopes of Palestinians and their allies who live in Berlin. Through a sequence of staged and abstract images, the project juxtaposes key monuments erected around Berlin to commemorate specific events in history with hidden or abstract participants. In collaboration with artist Michael Jabareen, chosen frames within the series include his lined illustrations to emphasise the story behind each image. Despite a bloody history, which includes an occupation wall, Germany is one of the most repressive places in Europe for (pro) Palestinian voices. Bottled up public “guilt” from the Holocaust, together with systemic racism in the German political system, contribute to biased and blind support to a fascist settler colony in Palestine. The systemic and brutal crackdown by the German government has tremendously increased since October 7th, 2023. Cacti have traditionally surrounded Palestinian lands. They remain silent witnesses to depopulated villages and the continued colonisation of our home. They symbolise beauty, continuation, and stubborn resistance. When one Palestinian voice is raised, it echoes and spreads like cacti. It shall never be silenced.

Date
6-29 May
Opening event 6:00 pm

A Photographic Exploration of the Bosniak Community in Southwestern Serbia
Vladimir Zivojinovic

Egypt's Forgotten Architecture Vladimir Zivojinovic (b.1993) is a documentary photographer based in Belgrade, Serbia. He started his career as a volunteer in 2015. in the daily newspaper. Vladimir joined Inland photo collective in 2022. Focused on the news, social and humanitarian issues in Balkans. For four years, he worked for Ringier Axel Springer, and his work is published in domestic media such as daily newspaper Blic, weekly magazine NIN, and online publication Vice. He works for AFP as a stringer, and his work has been picked up by foreign outlets such as French magazine Paris Match, Liberation, Vice UK, BBC, The Telegraph UK, La Repubblica, Independent UK, BILD, The Economist, The New York Times. he as well works with BBC, Getty Images and with UNICEF Srbija. He has also worked with clients Oxfam International, Open Society Foundation, Le Monde, ESPN, British GQ, UNDP, European Commission, UNHCR, The Guardian, Der Spiegel, Liberation, NBC news.
This project will explore and document the lives of the Bosniak community, one of the largest minorities in Serbia, located predominantly in the underdeveloped southern region. The Bosniak community faces discrimination and marginalization in predominantly Orthodox Christian country. They were often excluded from political and economic power structures and were subject to negative stereotypes and biases. In recent years, there have been e orts to address this discrimination and promote greater inclusion and acceptance of the Bosniak community in Serbia. However, discrimination and marginalization still exist, and there is a need for ongoing e orts to promote greater understanding, respect, and inclusion. The project aims to provide greater visibility and recognition to the Bosniak community’s identity, culture, and history, which has been underrepresented and often ignored in mainstream Serbian society. Using photography as a medium, my aim is to raise awareness of the challenges they face and change the negative stereotypes that many people in Serbia have of Bosniaks. Furthermore, the project aims to create a positive impact by promoting greater understanding and acceptance of Bosniaks in Serbia, and to create an opportunity for the community to showcase their unique identity and heritage.

Date
1-29 May
Opening event 6:30 pm
Address

To Exist is to Resist
Hanan Awad

Hanan Awad is a Palestinian American street photographer based in Houston. Her photos have been exhibited around the world. After having had solo exhibitions in Abu Dhabi-UAE (2012, 2013, 2014 and 2017), Houston-Texas (2018 ,2019,and 2022), Gallery Al Quds in Washington D.C. (2019), Denton-Texas (2020 and 2024), MESA conference, and at the La Biennale d’ Arte in Venice (2022) With a keen eye for disappearing places and traditions, Hanan’s photos document the tragedy of the physical and cultural forced displacement of Palestinians and narrate the story of Palestinian resilience/resistance against the colonialist occupation of Palestine She holds a B.A. from Rutgers University, New Jersey in Middle Eastern Studies and a Masters in Latin America and the Middle East from University Of Central Oklahoma. She earned a filmmaking certificate from New York Film Academy
As time has passed, the life of the Palestinian Bedouin has gotten harsher. Not because of their way of life, or culture, or the weather, but because of the military occupation. During my visits to Palestine, I witnessed how occupation sought to culturally cleanse whatever was left of something called “Bedouin”. I came to understand that the Jahalin Bedouins will continue to resist the constant Israeli cultural cleansing policies, showing their love of tradition through family ties and maintaining the memory of an all-but- lost identity generation after generation. Despite the occupation’s attempts to uproot the Bedouin culture in Palestine, the Bedouin memory continues to protect their tradition through blood lineage and tribal affiliation. Unfortunately, the Bedouin life is slowly vanishing as a result of the challenges of the occupation, specifically displacement, which changes their tradition and culture. The Bedouin struggle has become more than maintaining the name of the land and heritage, more than liberating the tent and the livestock; it has become a struggle to liberate the occupied mind and body. The Bedouins have become refugees in their own country, exiles within their own land. While my work focuses on the Bedouins, their story is an example of Palestinians in general. Be it the city dweller, the villager, or the Bedouin, Palestinians share the same struggle

Date
2-29 May
Opening event 6:00 pm
Address

My I
Mira khleif

Mira khleif is a designer and architect who left the corporate world to raise her 2 boys and while at it she founded her company MkandM – an educational kids brand that offers creative tools, products and ideas making the journey of parenting playful, and impactful. Mira also spends her time behind the lens. She uses photography, her education and conceptual skills to capture moments, spaces and emotions, which convey ideas through a photographic artistic image. She is a member of Darat al Tasweer organization in Amman, Jordan. What initially started as a hobby turned very quickly into a semi-professional artistic expression. Mira competed on an international level and her work was recognized in 2015 & 2014 for the general nature category, in 2013 for the local life category in turkey, through the Dask-Dogay nature shoot-out contest. Mira took second place in the image festival photography competition, named Macro and Me. Her work was exhibited in several art galleries in the Jordan including her solo project, a walk through Fontainbleau forest; A plethora of hidden gems.
My I project is a documentary of emotions; a chronological journey directed by me through myself. I was diagnosed almost 15 years ago with condyle mandibular asymmetry; simply put, I had one side of my jaw growing longer than the other. This condition manifests aesthetically in a skewed and asymmetrical smile, and functionally as difficulty eating along with joint pain. My I Self- portrait photography project is my personal visual diary that came to life as a coping mechanism to finding symmetry in the skewed and beauty in the abnormal. The camera’s lens allowed me to both document and process my emotions, testing my core being and how I choose to exist in this world.
In My I series the inner self takes a physical life and becomes visible with the outer self in one image. The combination brings out the different personalities of both, emphasizing on their individuality and entity at once. The series portray the process of the inner self coming out, the blurred and uncertain moments through self-actualisation and the clear, transparent schizophrenia at hand.
That being said the two can only exist simultaneously and not as a singularity, they must support one another and feed from each-others conflicts even to the extent that they implode becoming singularity. The impersonation of the inner self hopes to reflect a true- self understanding, providing a holistic personal identity that exists in its absolute true authentic self.

Date
30 April -29 May
Opening event 7:00 pm
Address

Metro
Hadeer Mahmoud

Hadeer has been working for an Egyptian newspaper since June 2011. Her work focuses on marginalized communities and social issues, especially women’s issues and the marginalization these communities are exposed to. She cooperates with Reuters. Her work has been published in Reuters,The New York Times, dpa, vice, Unido and Svenska Dagbladet newspaper She was accepted in the international class at the University of Applied Sciences and Arts at Hochschule Hanover. New York Times chose her between 12 other photographer in its Emerging Photographers You Should Know. She is an Arab Documentary Photography fellow. She published her first a photo book ‘Metro’ in 2016. She exhibited her work at many festivals such as Photoville, Eyes on main street and Cairo photo week.
I take it every day to work. I stand waiting for the metro while watching its crowded carts passing by. I take a deep breath and throw my body into it like an object. And while searching for a place to stand in, my personal space is violated more and more. I stand watching faces that hold so many stories and details, while listening to the unstoppable voices of salesmen crossing the underworld of the metro. It’s like another world where stories and scenes meet all underground. I thank God as I am leaving this underground world to the one above. But though my daily suffering inside it, metro became a part of me that I must tell about.

Date
7-29 May
Opening event 6:00 pm
Address

Unspoiled Jordanian Landscape | Color slides 1975-1995
Jean-Baptiste Humbert

Born in 1940 Dominican and archaeologist (Iran, Jordan, Gaza) From deep eastern France, Humbert began photographing with a Kodack Retinette at the age of 17, and started processing black-and-white prints on paper. At the same time, he took up academic drawing. As an archaeologist, he trained in the discipline of archaeological field photography, and sought to perfect the combination of framing and contrast.
While travelling tirelessly throughout the Middle East for professional purposes, he was attentive to the beauty of the landscape and sensitive to the poetry of light. In contrast to the intention of capturing ‘moments’ on film, each shot is, for him, the culmination of an emotion or a meditation. Photography means creating “images”. He has travelled through Turkey, Syria, Yemen, Oman and Arabia. But his long investment in Jordan has enabled him to appreciate its inexhaustible artistic potential.

Date
1-29 May
Opening event 6:30 pm
Address

Aloft, Textured Landscapes of Jordan
Bashar Tabbah

Bashar Tabbah is a multicultural Jordanian-British photographer, traveller, and author. Bashar’s passion for photography, exploration, and history has dominated his life. Growing up in Jordan, surrounded by its historical treasures, has strongly influenced his interests and outlook. Since 2004, he has travelled extensively and photographed hundreds of historical locations worldwide, as well as in Jordan. He primarily focuses on sites of historical and cultural significance, and has published and collaborated on several books over the past decade. Bashar’s photography bridges the gap between documentation and artistry. He describes what he does as a combined form of freedom of movement and first-hand education in the past and its remains.
In 2018, Bashar Tabbah joined the Aerial Archaeology in Jordan (AAJ) project, which has been photographing and monitoring Jordan’s heritage sites for the past 26 years, crucially serving as both an investigative project; to document and log previously undiscovered sites, and as a documentary project; to record the destruction and loss of sites over time. While working with the AAJ, Bashar brought his own perspective to the project, to not only document, but take an artistic approach to aerial photography at every opportunity. This exhibition brings together the most beautiful and impactful shots taken between 2018 to 2024.

Date
1-29 May
Opening event 6:30 pm
Address

Al–Salt - A photo documentary project
Fatima Abbadi

Fatima Abbadi (1978), an Italian-Jordanian Palestinian freelance photographer, embroiderer, and collector of Jordanian and Palestinian traditional dress based in the Netherlands. Having spent her formative years between the UAE (Abu Dhabi), Jordan, and Italy, she brings a rich multicultural perspective to her work. As a member of the Italian Mignon Group, established in 1995 to promote Street Photography and black and white analogue film, Fatima is committed to redefining the portrayal of women and exploring the phenomenon of Orientalism. Through her photography, she aims to document daily life in Europe and the Middle East, particularly focusing on female subjects. Her overarching goal is to present an authentic narrative often overshadowed by media stereotypes, fostering intercultural bridges for greater understanding and mutual respect.
Photography: Fatima Abbadi, Text: Ismael Abder-Rahman Gil In our current era, profound shifts in geopolitical, social, and economic landscapes are reshaping regions worldwide, notably the Middle East. This instability, spanning across the Mediterranean and affecting Europe, promises to forever alter the cultures and identities of involved nations. We witness both gradual, almost subconscious, and sudden, violent transformations of entire territories. Whether spurred by globalization, conflicting interests, or ideological imposition, the consequence remains the same: the erosion of cultural heritage and collective memory, and the diminishing of ancient customs and complexities.
Amidst this flux, documenting these cultures becomes imperative to safeguarding diverse memories and humanity’s rich tapestry, now threatened with annihilation. Thus, I’ve embarked on a mission to preserve and capture these memories, focusing on my family’s hometown, Al-Salt, nestled in Jordan’s heart. This city, with its predominant Muslim population intertwined with a significant Christian presence, embodies the intricate fusion of Arab and European influences fostered by the Mediterranean.
Over the past 15 years, I’ve diligently documented Al-Salt’s relentless metamorphosis, striving to preserve its essence and appeal to the conscience of those capable of preserving what remains of its precious heritage. As the city undergoes rapid changes year by year, its traditions and way of life face an existential threat, urging urgent action to safeguard its fading diversity.

Date
30 April -25 May
Opening event 6:00 pm

Ahel el-Ard
Samar Hazboun

Palestinian Samar Hazboun travels into the depth of her soul to inspect the human state and use photography as a tool to capture these visuals. Samar holds a masters degree in Photojournalism from the University of Westminster, a BA in International Relations, and a degree in Photo and Video Therapy. In 2019, she was a mentor for the Canon education program in Italy. In 2018 she was chosen for the JS Masterclass for the World Press Photo.
She worked as a Middle East Photo Editor for AFP for over 4 years before embarking on a freelance career.
Samar won the Self-Portrait category in the 11th Pollux award. She was awarded grants by the Magnum Foundation, AFAC, and the Prince Claus Fund. She was also awarded the Khalil Al-Sakakini award for her project Hush - Gender based violence in Palestine.
Ahel el-Ard is a project that delves into the deep-rooted connection that Palestinians have with their land. Through subtle and artistic imagery, the project showcases how individuals seamlessly blend with their surroundings, creating a poetic portrayal of their harmonious relationship with the land. To Palestinians, land signifies far more than mere property – it embodies culture, relationships, ecosystems, social structures, spirituality, and legal systems.
In light of recent events, there is a need to closely examine how Palestinian individuals naturally express themselves in connection to their land, without imposing any preconceived ideas upon them. By gathering images I captured throughout Palestine in recent years, a visual map is created to illustrate the profound bond between the photographed subjects and the land they inhabit.

Date
7-29 May
Opening event 6:00 pm
Address

Gaza, the continuous war
Samar Abu Elouf

A Palestinian freelance photojournalist. An award-winning journalist, Abu Elouf covers events where she lives, including stories about gender, women’s and children’s lives, and the consequences of war. Since 2010, she has worked as a freelance photojournalist on assignment for Reuters, The New York Times, and other news outlets.
Abu Elouf documented the 2018–2019 Gaza border protests, also known as the Great March of Return. She also worked with ZUMA Press to cover stories related to the COVID-19 pandemic for the International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC) and news agencies. In May 2021, on assignment for The New York Times, she covered the 11 days of fighting between Israel and Hamas that destroyed essential infrastructure and killed more than 230 people, including several of her own relatives.
Palestinian photographer Samar Abu Elouf as the 10th annual recipient of its Anja Niedringhaus Courage in Photojournalism Award.
Most recently, Samar covered the 2023 Israeli bombardment of Gaza in the aftermath of Hamas’ October 7th attacks for The New York Times. Her images, both intimate and shocking, convey both the anguish and dignity of her subjects.
commissioned by The New York Times documenting the impact of war on women and children in October and November 2023. Previously based in Gaza City, Abu Elouf puts herself at the center of danger to chronicle how conflict, loss, and need affect people in her own community. Late last year, Abu Elouf was forced to evacuate her home after it was partially destroyed. “The camera has made me a strong woman, and I will continue working and taking photos until my last breath.” said Abu Elouf

Date
1-29 May
Opening event 6:30 pm
Address

Echoes of Home
Sandro Basili

Sandro Basili is a French photographer based in Beirut, who employs photography as a means to connect with people.
Driven by a curious mind and a desire to instigate imagination, Sandro finds his voice within minimalism and documentary photography, seamlessly blending visual storytelling with the depth of the mundane.
His expertise lies in exploring a range of formats to better tell ongoing stories – from the raw energy of street photography to the reportage of current global and local events. In his images, he debates struggles, sheds light on less-covered topics, and tries to capture the humanity within each story. By drawing attention to what is often overlooked, Sandro consistently challenges preconceived notions as he presents alternative ways of perceiving the present.
Documenting displaced families lives in school shelters in Southern Lebnon. From January to April 2024 Following the 2023 Israel war on Gaza, clashes between Hezbollah and Israel escalated along the Blue Line, compelling South Lebanon residents to flee northward. In the aftermath of October 8th, these families sought refuge in Tyre’s schools, where classrooms became makeshift shelters, offering a home for those with no other option.
With no foreseeable return date, these families display remarkable resi ience. Some adapt readily to the changes, while others struggle to redefine their existence and endure an uncertainty that may linger indefinitely.
This series aims to capture the recreation of living spaces in unpredictable times, illustrating how the families adapt, support one another, and strive to create a new sense of home.
Through the creation of new rituals and collective efforts, they cultivate a sense of security and establish routines, transforming these temporary spaces into homes.

Date
1-29 May
Opening event 6:30 pm

Red Brick Dreams
Mohammad Kotb

Mohammad Kotb is an Egyptian photographer from Alexandria, whose work focuses on long-term projects, social narratives, and humanitarian anthropological issues. He graduated from Beirut Arab University, Faculty of Arts, and obtained a diploma in photojournalism from the Danish-Egyptian Dialogue Initiative in cooperation with the Danish DMJX School of Photojournalism in Cairo.
Mohammad also obtained a first-level diploma in the photojournalism and documentary photography program with the VII Academy
Kotb’s work has been shown in many photojournalistic exhibitions and workshops, and he has won many prestigious awards, including the Arab Fund for Arts and Culture and the Prince Claus Fund in Amsterdam, the Netherlands, in partnership with the Magnum Foundation in New York, USA. . . He launched the Arab Documentary Photography Program (ADPP) in 2021. He also won the CatchLight x FotoFest: West Coast Review Sessions - CatchLight Visual Storytelling Summit 2023 competition in San Francisco, USA, and participated in the Sardar Gallery in the 2021 and 2023 editions. Within the activities of the Cairo Image Festival. He also recently participated in the Photo Week Festival in Alexandria 2024.
He also participated in the Roznama Art Exhibition Competition presented by the Medrar Foundation in 2023 Kotb is passionate about using photography to tell the stories of marginalized and underrepresented communities. His work is often characterized by intimacy, empathy, and social awareness.
In The Egyptian legend of Al Nadaha appears in the dark night, tempting her prey into the unknown. In the Nile Valley of today, Al Nadaha appears in the daylight, as a vicious cycle that traps poor rural families and forces their daughters to sacrifice their educations for hard labor in the more than twenty red brick factories on the western shore of the Nile.
For one father who met his wife working in the factories, his hopes for better opportunities for his four daughters were dashed by the family’s economic reality. Hanaa and Suzanne, the two eldest, were forced to leave school and now work all day carrying bricks in the factories on the outskirts of the city of Rashid in order to save money for their future marriages.
This project traces the family’s difficult path as they search for a way out of this cycle.

Date
7-29 May
Opening event 6:00 pm
Address

Untitled stamps
Zaynab Talib Alalawi

Zaynab Talib Alalawi is an Iraqi photographer and academic, born in Baghdad, came to Amman in 2002, the beauty of nature in Jordan inspired her to discover her love and passion for photography. Her work includes the inventive picture of the philosophical concept reflecting the dipthe of the human soul emerging from personal experiences and history and identity. She participated in many art expeditions.
pictorial work handling the expatriate and his existential struggle. How he views and manages his daily life and tyis it with the past.
sign up, made her portrait photography from taking pictures of the symbols which take her to the memory; she edited her drawings to become postcards with no clear address; leaving that task to the viewer, what harmonizes with his dreams and fears and passions. Making the recipients imagination a hidden part from the picture emerging gradually; increasing with the time of observation and dolving beyond the image. depth and simplicity are her mean anchor for its picture origin leaving small windows for the color to arrange itself on the top of the image.

Date
1-29 May
Opening event 6:30 pm
Address

My ghost walks with me
Nidal Rohmi

Nidal Rohmi is a photojournalist based in the Gaza Strip. Rohmi has been covering conflicts and wars in Gaza since 2008 until now, focusing on the tragedy of war and human emotions. With a background in Media & Communication and Design Management, he has worked with many international and local photography agencies. In 2016, he participated in the Visual Storytelling Photography Workshop in Gaza City by Rawiya Collective and the World Press Photo. In 2022-2023 he participated in the Arab Documentary Photography Program by The Arab Fund for Arts and Culture in partnership with Magnum Foundation and the Prince Claus Fund.
During the 2014 Gaza war, I was shooting in the Shujaiya neighborhood, east of the city. There was random shelling of the place where I was. After the sound of shells, there was a great silence. I looked around and saw many wounded people on the ground. I felt that I had lost my limbs. I did not feel them. I put my hands on my body, feeling my limbs, they were there, and I was not injured.
I continued shooting my assignment.
I was eight years old when my family moved back to Gaza. It was 1995, a year after Arafat returned to Palestine and dreams were so high for liberation and for an independent state. In 2001, I heard the F16s bombing Gaza. A new intifada had started. Since 2006 until today, the Israeli army has not ceased bombing Gaza.
Wherever you look in Gaza, you find people with amputations. There are at least 1,600 amputees among a Gaza population of two million people. This project documents the lives, ambitions, and challenges of Palestinians who have lost their limbs during the Gaza war and “Great March of Return” on the border.

Date
1-29 May
Opening event 6:30 pm
Address

Fading Dunes
Yassine El Attar

I am a 30 years old Moroccan Photographer based in Laayoune south Morocco. I do documentary photography on film and digital. i like to work in medium and longterm human based photography projects that raise awareness to south moroccan environmental and social issues. I like to photograph using film as the medium makes the process longer and more enjoyable. Currently I’m working on 3 documentary projects : ‘Marketplace’, ‘Fading Dunes’ and ‘Tantan festival’.
In the vast Sahara Desert, where the shifting sands whisper tales of ancient cultures and resilient peoples, something profound is happening. The tribes that have traveled these empty lands for hundreds of years are facing unprecedented challenges that threaten their very existence. As the modern world takes over their traditional way of life, the existence of saharan nomadic tribes is at stake.
Fading dunes is a long term human based documentary project made exclusively on film to showcase the effect of climate crisis and urbanization on the overlooked people of south morocco who live in the front line facing risks of food and water shortages, displacement and conflicts. As a photographer originated from a saharian nomadic tribe in western moroccan sahara, i’m directly affected by these issues, therefor I aim to explore and document my region and tell the stories of my people, who lived here in the past as free nomadic tribes before the transformation to modern citizens, and drawing attention to the changes that are amplifying every year on our weather, landscape and water supply.

Date
5-29 May
Opening event 7:00 pm

Memories for Sale
Ahmed Alabbadi

Ahmed Alabbadi is a photographer born in 2004, and raised in Aden. He started in the field of experimental photography when he found it to be the most suitable way to narrate stories and capture accumulated emotions and some of the issues that touch him. Ahmed has participated in numerous local and international exhibitions.
In this project, a certain feeling was formulated that resonates with the majority of those affected by wars in societies, which is a feeling stemming from the desire to return to home, the safe haven for humans, and the feeling of losing security and stability in a contradictory manner. It shows the difficulty of returning to live in areas where our memories are suspended on the walls, despite the destruction, due to the harsh conditions they have endured.

Date
1-29 May
Opening event 6:30 pm
Address

Autograph: A glimpse of Grandma’s eternal existence
Ahmed Waleed

Ahmed Waleed, a 28-year-old Egyptian photographer, I’m doing photography since I was young but the real debut was from 2013. I have participated in many exhibitions inside and outside Egypt, the latest being last February at the “Sard” exhibition during Alexandria Photo Week. My recent project was titled “Deterioration.” My favorite types of photography are architectural, heritage, and documentary. I believe in the power of images to evoke emotions and provoke thoughts, and I always strive to leave a positive impact through my lens.
My dear grandmother: I am very grateful for all the times we spent together learning from you how to make a meal that I later could not master like you, or listening to songs that later became among my favorites. I am very grateful that you were my safe haven in my difficult times, for the sofa sessions that were more like the psychiatrist’s chaise longue, I talk and talk without boredom or fear, for your secret assistance to me that no one knew except us, for the phrase “Have a good month, my good man” when the first of every month comes, for many things that will never be forgotten and for a lasting effect that will never go away.

Date
1-29 May
Opening event 6:30 pm
Address

Timeless Identities
Collective 220

Collective 220 is a photographic narrative rooted in diverse and scattered areas of Algeria, telling the stories of people, towns and spaces. The desire to create this group arose primarily from our need to offer a space for exchange, reflection and joint work in an environment that has hitherto lacked this kind of collective experience. Our approaches and our visual languages vary, but we share the same desire to photograph our realities in a personal and subjective way, to tell our stories and to provide other perspectives on what Algeria is today.
The members of the collective are: Houari Bouchenak, Celia Bougdal, Soufian Chemcham, Youcef Krache, Cléa Rekhou, Fethi Sahraoui and Abdo Shanan.In a bid to open up the fields of collaboration and sharing, we have invited the artist Soufian Zouggar to take part in this exhibition.
“Nothing is less certain than the image of our identity. Nothing is less fixed, even less constant than continuous and totalitarian, than this image. We would be the bed, and it would be the river that flows through it and remains anchored in the permanence of its passage. in the permanence of its passage. It is said that we never bathe, we never bathe in the same water. This can also mean identity, despite the illusion that we have of it when faced with a river and its performance.”
Mohammed DIB
The curatorial approach of Timeless Identities has been built around the idea of reflecting on the ramifications of missing images in Algeria. By highlighting visual histories that are invisible, lost or deliberately concealed, we seek to understand how their absence may have affected our understanding of events and the way in which they eventually emerge. This forces us to question the authenticity and completeness of the stories we encounter on a daily basis, and pushes us to explore the blurred boundary between the real and the unreal. Because missing does not mean not existing.

Date
8-29 May
Opening event 6:00 pm

GAZA HABIBTI

Since 2019, a group of photographers, both men and women, has dedicated itself to collecting visual narratives from Palestine. The driving force behind our endeavors has been the element of hope, as we gathered inspiring and diverse untold stories about the Palestinian people. With the current war in Gaza, everything has taken a dramatic turn. We are now compelled to document stories of those who have been killed, yet carried the torch of hope. Between the stories we recorded before the war and those we are capturing now, one clear narrative emerges: nothing can strip the Palestinian people of their humanity and their right to dream of freedom.

Date
1-29 May
Opening event 6:30 pm
Address

Untold Palestine

Untold Palestine is a project of YURA, an organization that seeks to achieve social change through storytelling. The project brings together a group of Palestinian photographers and visual storytellers who work to tell the story of Palestinian life in all its places through photography and video. The group aims to liberate and reclaim the Palestinian narrative and tell it authentically, challenging prevailing stereotypes.
Participating in the exhibition are 20 visual storytellers who were part of creating this collective.
Abdulrahman Zaquot, Anas Ziad Fatiha, Aseel Al-Kabriti, Bilal Al-Hams, Dalia Taha Dalloul, Fatima Shabir, Fatima Hassouna, Hani Al Shaer, Haneen Salem, Hossam Salem, Jamileh Tawfiq, Loay Ayyoub, Mahdi Zaarab, Mahmoud Ajour, Mahmoud Abu Hamda, Mohamed Salem, Samar Abu Elouf, Sharif Sarhan, Rahaf Al Batniji, Wafa Abu Hajjaj, Salama Yaounis, Mohammed Saad.


Ideal Nature x Distorted City
Vinícius Garcia

Photographic exhibition that confronts two themes that inhabit the imagination of photographers: the idyllic images of nature in contrast to a dystopian essay on big cities. This exhibition brings together two elements that make up the existence of humanity: the countryside and the cities. Brazilian photographer Vinícius Garcia, a specialist in nature images, presents an essay made in the Pantanal, a biome in the interior of Brazil, his photos show a romantic vision of the bucolic landscape of the countryside, while photographer Malu Mesquita presents an essay taken in the city of São Paulo, the largest city in South America, where the images are constructed with noise, interference of objects between the camera and the urban scene or even with double exposure, forming a collection of photographs where the metropolis appears distorted.
He is a businessman and has dedicated himself to photography for over 10 years. His work frequently takes him to travel to different countries on the African continent. Even though his commitments on these trips involve other subjects, he always takes his camera with him and has built a giant portfolio with photographs from different countries in Africa. In 2021 he created a collection of the images produced and presents in the book “África” all the passion he has for the continent. Vinicius also produces images of nature, traveling around Brazil looking for impactful scenes, he finds a lot of inspiration for photography in the surf and beaches. He was recently in the Pantanal and the Amazon and is preparing a new book about the beautiful landscapes of Brazil.

Date
1-29 May
Opening event 6:30 pm
Address

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Malu Mesquita

Graduated in Advertising - Faculdades Integradas Metropolitanas FIAM/FAAM - 1990. Entered the world of arts in 2015, after a two-year professional course at the Escola Panamericana de Artes e Design. Her line of research since then has been Urban Space and the countless possibilities for artistic performance. she has participated in exhibitions in São Paulo; Saints; Rio De Janeiro and the Tiradentes Photography Festival, with a solo exhibition about her project “#NoMesmoMuro”, in addition to having participated in exhibitions in several countries, in Europe, Central and North America, the Middle East and Asia. Among the works highlighted are: Image Festival Amman, in Jordan.

Date
1-29 May
Opeming event 6:30 pm
Address

Postcard
O Jardim

The “Postcard” project is an initiative of the “O Jardim”, a space dedicated to photography in São Paulo, Brazil. The objective of this exhibition is to question the existence of photography and its coexistence with human beings. Invented in the 19th century, photography has great importance in representation in the modern world and strongly contributes to the way we know the world today. Photography transformed rapidly and the 21st century saw the great revolution that digital photography brought to relationships between people.
This exhibition is an opportunity to look at image production through a return to the practices of analogue photography, in the format of postcards and invite the public to interact and take home, in the format of a postcard, one of the images from exhibition.

Date
1-29 May
Opening event 6:30 pm
Address

Existence doesn’t blossoms without resilience
Nael Ikhmais

A student at the College of Engineering, specializing in electronics, a trainer of folkloric Dabke, and a first aid worker. I have a great passion for photography and have participated in several exhibitions and festivals, and now I am participating in the Amman Photo Festival for the third time in a row. I always strive to achieve success and excellence in every field I work in, and I strive to continuously develop myself and my skills.
In a small village on the outskirts of the West Bank called the Bedu village, lives Maryam Al-Dali, a strong and solid woman as a rock despite the bitterness of the life she lived. She was born during the time of the Nakba, got married In her youth, a young man was known as a hero. He was fighting with the Jordanian National Guard, and his heart was beating with patriotism and redemption. But the war was not merciful, and in one of the battles, He was martyred, leaving behind four young sons. After her husband’s death, Mary settled down. In her old home, she refused to leave it despite the difficulties and challenges she faced. She continued to work hard, raising her children and strengthening them to face life with all courage and determination. While her twenty-four grandchildren grew around her, She knows that her strength lies in her survival, in remaining home, carrying her memories and hope for a better tomorrow.

Date
1-29 May
Opening event 6:30 am
Address

Walid Khudair | The last Palestinian clog maker
Hasan Saleh

A Palestinian refugee photographer from Jaffa District, Salamah. He was born in the city of Nablus in 2004 and grew up in Balata refugee camp. Studies at Al-Quds Open University in the Faculty of Administrative and Economic Sciences. Photography became a passion for him. Hassan participated with Giz palestine where he learned the basics of photography and story telling documenting. He focused on capturing and documenting narratives that help understand the relationship between groups and individuals and convey cultures. He was also interested in documenting social, economic and political issues. He participated in several exhibitions in Palestine and Jordan and won the Best Picture Award. In the Palestinian Photography Marathon.
born in Nablus. age seventy, he runs the Khudair Carpentry, the only one in the West Bank that still makes clogs, and he started working with his father at a young age. This carpentry dates back to 1948, and he has been working in this profession for more than 55 years. He he uses natural pine wood to make clogs, which he cuts, shapes, and softens with great care. He considers his work a source of pride for him, and part of his identity and heritage. He crafts other wooden pieces, such as chairs, tillage sticks, and children’s cribs, using the pine wood that is famous in Palestine.

Date
1-29 May
Opening event 6:30 pm
Address

Existence: A Fragile and Precious Gift

This photo exhibition showcases the work of a group of photographers from Gaza, who captured the diverse and vibrant lives of their fellow citizens before the outbreak of the latest genocidal war. Each photographer focused on one aspect of one subject’s life, revealing their hopes, dreams, passions, and struggles. The photos depict girls who play football and practice Taek-won-do, a young man who works in a tyre-repair shop, and a mother and her teenage daughter who reminisce about their achievements.
These photos are not only snapshots of individual lives, but also reflections of the collective existence of a people who have endured decades of oppression, violence, and injustice. They celebrate the resilience, courage, and joy of the human spirit, even in the face of adversity. They also remind us of the fragility and preciousness of existence, as some of the subjects and photographers have been killed or displaced by the brutal war that erupted shortly after the photos were taken.
Through this exhibition, we invite you to witness and appreciate the beauty and diversity of existence, and to empathize with the suffering and loss of those whose existence has been threatened or taken away. We hope that this exhibition will inspire you to cherish your own existence, and to respect and protect the existence of others.
Before the outbreak in early October, a group of Gazan youth gathered from different areas in Gaza strip; Beit Hanoun, Jabaliya Refugee Camp, Gaza city and Khan Younes, learnt storytelling photography and filmed these stories, stories that we miss seeing in the mainstream now. Samar Abu Alouf was their trainer for about two years
Trainees who reported the stories: Ahmad Naim, Eman Khalil, Jumana Al Mughani, Saja Yaghi, Shahenaz Abu Sha’baan, Seba Al Khairi, Kamel Abu Kwiek, Rania Khalil, Ghazal Mughani, Mohammad Al Dali, Yasmeen Yaghi, Yousef Al Daor

Date
1-29 May
Opening event 6:30 am
Address